Foil-Pouch Cooking Tips

Foil Pouch Chicken Thighs

I grew up a grub-scout, and we cooked a LOT of foil-pouch dinners over campfires. We called them “Hobo Packs” back then (way before anyone had heard of “political correctness” lol)

MY KITCHEN CookbookNowadays, I make some up and freeze them before leaving for camping trips, to get a delicious dinner, with no clean up!

I have an exhaustive list of foil-pouch recipes and idea in the “MY KITCHEN Cookbook“, but here’s a couple of tips we teach the kid’s before we let them loose on the ingredients table:

One thing I see done a lot, when people are assembling foil-pouch meals, is that they want to place the meat on the bottom, and pile their veggies over that. While they probably think that this will ensure that the meat cooks faster, and thoroughly, it’s actually the opposite of how you want to build your pouch, and will only dry out and/or burn the meat.

The juiciest ingredients need to be placed closest to the foil (tomatoes are best), as they will be the least damaged if burnt, then ingredients with less moisture content on top of those, then your seasoning, and LASTLY the meat (pre-seasoned with salt and pepper.) Top with a little butter or olive oil, and close it up.

The reason for this layering: Fats/oils from the meat drips down to flavor the veggies, while the tomatoes, potatoes, onions, etc., contain water, which mixes with all those natural juices, and steams the meat into tenderness. That excess moisture also helps to keep your veggies from drying out.

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I also like to wrap the pouch, seam side down, in a second piece of foil, to help prevent leaking and scorching.

Personally, I like to brush a thin layer of bacon-fat, or schmaltz (rendered chicken fat) on the foil before I add my veggies.

It adds a little more flavor, and also helps prevent your veggies from sticking to the foil.

Then start cooking with the outer seam down. Try it and see what you think!

Boning HindquartersHome Chef Note: Don’t use boneless, skinless chicken breasts for foil-pouch cooking…just don’t do it.

They dry out too easily in this form of cooking, and they don’t bring any fat or flavor to the party.

Bone-in skin-on chicken thighs and hindquarter work great, though. Slice along both sides of the bones (but don’t remove them) before seasoning and cooking.

This not only gets more flavor into the meat, but it helps the meat cook faster, and more evenly!

Have any foil-pouch cooking questions? Let me know!

Enjoy!

~Chef Perry
chefperryperkins.com

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