Beef Masala Curry in Instant Pot, Slow Cooker, or Oven,

Beef Masala Curry

First, let’s get our terminology right…

Cooks in India typically use the word “curry” when referring to something with a sauce or gravy, rather than a specific blend of spices.

Bengal_Native_Infantry_1880The word curry was created by the British when they ruled India. It was their rendition of the Tamil word “kari”, meaning sauce.

Now the term is used to mean almost any stew-type of food from India.

Most of us Americans mistakenly use the word “Curry” when we’re actually talking about a “Masala” (meaning a mix of spices.)

Many of us, when we hear the word “masala” immediately think of Garam Masala, the popular Indian spice mix. “Garam” means warm or hot, and there are probably as many different recipes for Garam Masalas as there are grandmother’s in India…and there are a LOT of grandmother’s in India! 😉

Personally, this is my favorite curry recipe…

Beef Masala Curry

  • 2 lbs stew beef, 2 inch cubes
  • 1 lg yellow onion, chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 3 cup fresh peeled and crushed tomatoes
  • 1 cup fresh cilantro, chopped
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tsp turmeric
    2 tbsp garam masala (store-bought or see my recipe, below)
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper (opt)
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp lemon zest
  • 1/4 C sugar
  • 2 tbsp ghee (clarified butter), or olive oil
  • 1 cup strong beef stock
  • 1 cup coconut cream

Beef Masala Curry: The Meat

Pat beef cubes dry. (Remember, wet meat doesn’t brown, it turns grey.) Sprinkle the cubes with sea salt and black pepper, and toss with flour.

Stew Beef browning for Beef Marsala CurryHeat a saute pan over medium heat, add ghee or oil, and brown the beef top and bottom in batches. Don’t overcrowd the pan.

Remove each batch of browned beef cubes to a bowl, and add ghee to the pan as needed.

Instant Pot Beef Marsala Curry Recipe

The Curry Paste

When all of the beef has been browned, add more ghee, the chopped onions, garlic, spices, salt and pepper.

Cook until onions become translucent, for about 5-6 minutes.

ABeef Marsala Currydd your crushed tomatoes, brown sugar and cook, stirring, for another 2-3 minutes.

Pour the mixture into your slow cooker, Instant Pot, or Dutch Oven. and mix in the beef cubes.

(I like to make a double batch of the paste, to use in other recipes throughout the week!)

Beef Marsala CurryAdd stock, coconut cream, and lemon zest, and stir to combine.

COOK TIMES:

Instant Pot: 25 to 30 minutes
Slow Cooker: 8 hours on low/4 hours on the high
Dutch Oven (350F): 5 hours, stirring once.

If your Beef Masala Curry isn’t as thick as shown here, and you want it to be, switch your Instant Pot to “saute” mode, or place your Dutch Oven (uncovered) on the stove-top, and simmer until reduced, stirring constant.

Serve your Beef Masala Curry over steamed Jasmine steamed rice and top with fresh chopped cilantro, if you like it.

HOME CHEF Note: This is actually my SECOND favorite curry, as I love the richer, slightly gamier flavor of lamb over beef. The rest of the recipe remains the same.

Chef Perry’s Favorite Garam Masala

1/4 cup cumin seeds
2 tbsp coriander seeds
1 tbsp tellicherry peppercorns
1 tsp cloves
2 dried red chilies
2 inch piece of cinnamon stick
2 bay leaves
1 star anise
1 tsp fennel seeds
1/2 tsp nutmeg

Add all of the spices in a dry skillet over medium heat, stirring constantly.

Keep cooking until they just start to turn brown, and you can smell the aroma. Be very careful not to let them burn.

Remove from heat and, while still warm, toss it all into a spice grinder and grind to a fine powder.

HOME CHEF Note: This Garam Masala recipe not on;y makes a fantastic curry, but it’s also amazing with potatoes cooked in coconut milk, and makes for a tasty surprise in Deviled Eggs.

Love Curries? Be sure to check out these recipes, as well…

Thai Red Fish Curry

Thai Red Fish Curry

Salmon Curry with Couscous

Salmon Curry with Couscous

Pork and Sweet Potato Curry 2

Pork and Sweet Potato Curry


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Recipes from “Frugal Fine Cooking ~ A Home Chef’s Guide.”

This is the first in the series of guidebooks delving deeper into specific cooking styles and ingredients  discussed in, “The Home Chef: Transforming the American Kitchen”

Available on Amazon at: www.perryperkinsbooks.com

 

Chicken a la Wilkinson

Chicken a la Wilkinson recipe


21751631_1337601499702816_2967138024778684282_nThe Wilkinsons are not only old and dear friends, but they’re also staunch supporters of our MY KITCHEN Program, and my best personal chef clients.

For marketing purposes I won’t say that they’re also my favorite clients (but…they’re also my favorite clients.)

Don’t tell anyone.

I have had the honor of cooking in their beautiful kitchen many times, and when Ron called and asked if I could prepare a nice, upper-end, chicken-breast dinner for them and a few of their friends, I immediately thought of an old favorite: Chicken Georgia.

A simple recipe, Chicken Georgia is easy to prepare, lends itself to a fancy presentation, and with its thick, creamy mushroom sauce, falls solidly in the umami comfort food category.

As his lovely wife, Karen, requires a gluten-free menu, I’d incorporate the old-English method of using egg yolks, instead of flour, to thicken my sauce.

However, this was Ron, and Ron appreciates a little “over the top” when enjoying a fine meal. So, I took my old recipe to the drawing board…

Bacon, of course, would be absolutely essential and, along with a flavorful compound butter stuffed inside, would virtually guarantee that the chicken breasts remained juicy inside and out. Replace the onions with diced shallots – check. A little of my favorite pecorino romano to add a bit more depth to the sauce, and I give you…

Chicken a la Wilkinson!

The test dish received rave reviews from the home team, and was a smashing success at the party, served along with some Southern-style green beans, cilantro-lime rice, a nice green salad, and warm Dutch rolls. It was…lovely.

The Brine:

  • 1 cup fine sea salt
  • 1 cup fine sugar
  • 3 quarts very hot water
  • 4 cups of ice

The Chicken:

  • 4 chicken breasts, skinless, boneless, thawed
  • 4 tsp. Mushroom Garlic Compound Butter (recipe below)
  • 1 raw egg, beaten
  • 4-8 strips apple-wood smoked bacon, thin
  • 4-8 toothpicks
  • 2 oz. grated mozzarella cheese

The Sauce:

  • 4 tsp. butter
  • 2 tsp. olive oil
  • 1 cup sliced mushrooms
  • 1 Tbs. mushroom powder*
  • 2 pinch ea. black pepper
  • 2 tbsp. minced shallots
  • 1 cup homemade chicken stock
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream, room temp
  • 4 egg yolks, beaten
  • 2 oz. grated pecorino-romano cheese

brining chicken breastsBrine the Chicken:

Combine the salt, sugar, and hot water and stir until completely dissolved. Add ice to chill.

Once chilled, add the chicken breasts and brine for 4-6 hours.

Remove breasts from brine, rinse thoroughly, pat dry, and set aside.

Prep the Chicken:

Egg Eash: Whip your raw egg yolks in a flat-bottom bowl, and set aside.

Preheat your oven to 350F.

how to stuff a chicken breast with compound butterUsing a small knife, slice a deep pocket in the side of each breast (be careful not to pierce the other side!) and insert a teaspoon of chilled compound butter, pushing it as far back into the pocket as possible.

Dip the outside of the breast, along the pocket seam, in egg wash to seal.

Refridgerate breast for 20-30 minutes to set the seal.

IMG_5751Wrap each breast with 1-2 strips of back (depending on size) slightly overlapping, and secure the end with a toothpick.

(If you have trouble with the breast being slippery, use 2 toothpicks and secure the beginning end, first.)

Melt butter over medium heat and add the olive oil, mixing to combine.

Pan searing bacon wrapped chickenWhen hot, add the bacon wrapped chicken and sear 1-2 minutes on each side, just long enough to start the bacon browning.

Remove chicken to a baking dish, top with mozzarella, and place in the pre-heated oven for 20 minutes*** while making your sauce.

Bacon wrapped chicken with mozzerella

Mushroom Cream Sauce recipeMushroom Cream Sauce:

Put the pan back on the burner and lower the heat to medium. Deglaze your pan with 1/2 cup of chicken stock.

Add mushrooms and shallots and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cook 15-20 minutes covered, stirring often, until your mushrooms have reduced by at least half (the more they reduce, the more flavor they’ll have).

Add chicken stock and mushroom powder, and bring to a low simmer. Add your raw egg to the heavy cream, whisk to combine completely. While whisking the sauce vigorously, slowing pour in the cream/egg mixture until incorporated.

Whisk in the grated pecorino-romano cheese, reduce heat to med-low, and let the sauce reduce slightly, stirring often to keep it from separating.** (A sauce “separates” when the milk content curdles, creating an unappetizing texture.)

bacon wrapped chicken with mushroom sauceWhen the chicken reaches an internal temp of 160F, remove the roasting pan from the oven, pull out all of the toothpicks, top the chicken evenly with mushroom sauce, and pop it all back in the oven for 5 more minutes.

Serving:

Allow the dish to rest (the sauce will thicken slightly) about 5 minutes, then serve over rice, mashed potatoes, or polenta.

Mushroom Garlic Compound Butter
Mushroom Garlic Compound Butter

  • 1 stick of sweet cream butter, very soft
  • 1 Tbs. coarse black pepper
  • 1 Tbs. mushroom powder
  • 1 tsp. roasted garlic, or more to taste (you can sub this with garlic powder, but it won’t be as good.) 😉
  • 1/4 cup chopped parsley

Using the back of a metal spoon, combine all until mixed evenly (If using the compound in another recipe, which do not include brining, add 1 tsp. of fine sea salt before mixing.) Spoon the mixture onto a sheet of plastic-wrap and roll into a cylinder and twisting the ends to seal. Chill until hard.

Compound butter is great in soups and sauces, to top burger or steaks, and it’s a lovely way to fry or scramble eggs!

HOME CHEF NOTES:

*If you can’t find mushroom powder, you can make your own with dried mushrooms and a spice blender.

**If you get distracted and your sauce DOES separate (it’ll look like you’ve mixed cottage cheese into it) don’t panic, it happens! 😉 Using a slotted spoons, remove the mushrooms from the sauce. Using a stick-blender, or traditional blender, blend the sauce briefly until it’s smooth again. Wipe the pan clean. Rinse the mushrooms very briefly in hot water to remove the milk curds, and return to the pan with the mushrooms.

***If you’re using those huge “factory chicken” breasts, you may want to pound them slightly flatter (before brining), and add 10-15 minutes to the roasting time. Be safe – use a thermometer and cook to temp.


Home Chef Cookbooks

 

Peanut Butter Cookie Secrets

Peanut Butter Cookie Tips

Awesome Reader Elizabeth M. asks:

Hey Chef, How do you make peanut butter cookies more peanut-buttery?

——–

Thank you for asking, Elizabeth!

The problem: The simplest way, adding more peanut-butter, throws off your fat-to-flour ratio, and you end up with cookie pancakes with no backbone. I’ve tried adding powdered peanut butter in the past, but the aftertaste of the preservatives was off-putting.

Okay, so I’ve never told ANYONE my PB Cookie secret, but what the heck… 😉

“De La Rosa Marzipan Peanut Candy” (Amazon Link)

de la Rose mazapan candy

I first found these uber-peanut-buttery confections on a trip to Mexico City in my teens.

Replace 1/4th of the flour in your cookie recipe with an equal amount (by volume) of this amazing powdery candy, and you will find peanut-butter nirvana! It will also make them sweeter, so if that’s a problem, try cutting back on the sugar in your recipe until you reach a balance that’s right for you.

de la Rose mazapan candy

They’re FANTASTIC in a smoothie, too!

Spanish Peanuts for Peanut-Butter CookiesAlso, I like to add a couple of handfuls of whole, salted Spanish peanuts (hulls removed) to my dough.

Let me know how it goes!

~Chef Perry

PS: The link above us to buy them on Amazon, but if you have an Latino market nearby, they’re almost sure to carry them.


Home Chef Cookbooks

 

Reverse Seared Prime Rib Roast

Reverse Seared Prime Rib

HomeChef Michelle asks:

Hi Chef Perry, I have a couple questions. Fixing prime rib tomorrow, 9 pounds. Family wants it cooked medium, serving at 3 pm. When should I put it in?

Also, how much salt?

Saw you on AMNW this week!

Thanks!

—–

Hi Michelle!

Thanks for asking (and for watching the show!)

Here’s how I do it:

Dry out the surface of the roast by salting, and then resting it uncovered in the fridge overnight.

For a 10# prime, I’d use 4 Tbs of coarse sea salt, spread evenly.

Bring the prime rib to room temperature before roasting. It usually takes about 2 hours out on the counter.

Preheat the oven to 200°F

Reverse Seared Prime Rib

Pat the prime rib dry, and set on a roasting pan bone side down (fat side up). Add any additional spices. I like Montreal Steak Seasoning.

Roast until the center reads 130°F for medium doneness, about 3.5-4 hours.

NOTE: Personally, I like my center cuts to be medium rare, which gives me a couple of more well done slices at either end, so I roast mine to an internal temp of 120°F, then follow the remaining steps.

Remove the prime rib from the oven, cover with a foil and rest for 30 minutes.

Increase the oven temperature to 500°F

10 minutes before serving, pop the prime rib into the oven, uncovered, and cook it until it’s nice and brown, and crisp on the outside, about 6-10 minutes.

Reverse Seared Prime Rib
Medium Rare Center Slice

Serve immediately.

Let me know if you have any questions along the way, I’ll be watching FB for notifications!

Merry Christmas!

~Chef Perry


Looking for more great holiday recipes? Check out the new guidebook, “Holiday Cooking: A Home Chef’s Guide.” NOW AVAILABLE ON AMAZON!

Holiday Cooking: A Home Chef's Guide

The Best Pulled Pork Sliders

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Okay, I like to cook with wood and charcoal, but I get a lot of emails asking how to modify my recipes to a gas grill (yes, I own gas grills) and even for the oven.

Some recipes just can’t be adapted, others can with decent results, and some…well, as much as this is going to tick-off the die-hards…some you can hardly tell the difference! Here’s one of my favorites.

Oh, and if you want to recreate a true “Southern pulled pork sandwich”, and really take ’em to the next level… be sure to add a couple of tablespoons of our Simple Tangy Slaw on top of the meat and sauce. Yeah, baby!

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Pulled Pork BBQ

(In the  gas grill, oven, or smoker) 1 Pork shoulder (6-8lb) Burnin’ Love Rub (see below) Basic BBQ Sauce (see below)

Rub the shoulder with spices. Set it aside for a few minutes and rub again over any wet spots. Keep doing this until there are no wet spots, the heavier the rub, the better. This makes the “bark” of the shoulder. Wrap the whole thing in plastic wrap and fridge 12-24 hours.

Take shoulder out of fridge and let sit 60 minutes to bring the temp up.

 

For the gas grill:

You want indirect heat for cooking, you can easily do this on a conventional gas grill. Just keep the meat as far from the heat source as possible, or it will burn during the long cooking time. You want to cook this at 250 degrees Fahrenheit; you can go as high as 275, but no higher. You don’t want to go lower than 250, as you will start to dry out the meat before it is cooked.

Put the shoulder on the “cool side” of the grill, and  place a disposable pan with a couple of cups of apple juice underneath it to add moisture and catch the drippings. A spray bottle with 50/50 apple juice and cider vinegar is nice for basting, as well.

A lot of folks like to use apple chips, soaked, for smoking. You can add 1/2 cup to a disposable tin pan over the “hot” side of your gill, every 30 minutes for the first 3 hours.

Personally, I prefer to use a small, nearly indestructible smoke box, called the “A-Maze-N Smoker”. It’s a metal-mesh maze that holds your favorite flavor of smoking pellets, and burns slowly enough to allow a three-hour smoke without constantly having to lift the cover and let all of that precious heat out. It’s cheap, and I’ve used my dozens of times with no visible wear or tear.

Here’s a quick video I did on using this unit with my La Caja China, but the principle would be the same in anything from a gas grill to a Weber Kettle.

A-Maze-N Smoker Review

If you don’t trust your on-board thermometer, get a cheap instant read (or better, a digital probe) and stick the probe all the way through a halved potato. Set the potato cut-side down on the grill. This keeps your thermometer off the grates.

After three to four hours, remove the shoulder from your grill, and roast (uncovered) in a pre-heated oven at 225d for 10-12 hours. The pork is done when it reaches an internal temperature of 200 degrees. If you don’t have an instant read thermometer (you should really get one) the meat is done when it pulls apart easily with a fork.

Pork Shoulders

In The Oven

Follow the same prep directions as above. Pre-heat the oven to 225F, and roast the shoulder, fat-cap up, uncovered, for 14 hours (yes, I said fourteen. I usually roast mine overnight.)

Follow the “Finishing” steps, below.

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On the Traeger

Once the shoulder(s) are prepped, start Traeger on “Smoke” with the lid open until it’s cruisin’ (4 to 5 minutes). Set temp at 225F and preheat, lid closed, for about 15 minutes.

Place shoulders on the grill, fat-cap up, and smoke for 3 hours, spraying with a mix of apple juice and cider vinegar (50/50) every hour after the three hours.

Put shoulders in a large disposable aluminum foil pan and up the temp to 250F.

Roast shoulder for 8 more hours, or until an instant-read meat thermometer inserted in the thickest part, but not touching a bone, registers 190 degrees F.

If the skin starts to get too dark, cover it loosely with foil.

Finishing

Remove the pan from the heat, tent shoulder(s) loosely in foil, and let rest for 30 minutes. Pour the juices from the bottom of the pan into a fat separator. Mix broth (fat removed) with some salt and cider vinegar, to taste, and pour back over the meat after shredding. Allow to rest an additional 10 minutes to soak up the juices.

Serve either as sliders, or with a sauce on the side (see below) and some white bread slices to use as edible napkins!

Pork shoulder in smokePulled Pork Tips:

For “oven only”…before applying the dry rub, brush the entire shoulder generously with Stubbs (brand name) Mesquite Liquid Smoke, allow the surface to dry, and repeat. The apply the dry rub (while still damp.) Note: this is the ONLY liquid smoke that I’ll allow in my kitchen. For the smoker, I like a wood chip/chunk blend of 75% oak,

 

Perk’s “Burnin’ Love” Rub

(Shh…it’s a secret!)

¼ C fine sea salt
¼ C light brown sugar
2 Tbs garlic powder
2 Tbs onion powder
4 Tbs Italian seasonings (spicy, if you can find them)
2 Tbs smoked paprika
2 Tbs coarse black pepper
2 Tbs hickory salt
1 teaspoon cayenne powder (opt)

Northern Carolina Vinegar Sauce

Personally, I think this very old, very traditional recipe is the best and only sauce for pulled pork.

  • 2 cups apple cider vinegar
  • 2 Tbs. smoked paprika
  • 2 Tbs white sugar
  • 4 tsp, fine sea salt
  • 2 tsp. coarse ground black pepper
  • 1 to 2 tsp. red pepper flakes

Combine all, simmer and cool. The longer it sits, the better it is!

But if you MUST have your thick, sweet, ketchup-based sauce…here’s a great one…

Basic BBQ Sauce (my cheater version)

1 cup Sweet Baby Rays Brown Sugar BBQ sauce
½ cup honey
1/2 stick sweet cream butter
Red pepper flakes to taste (opt)

Combine all, simmer and allow to cool.

NOTE: This makes a fantastic sauce for grilled chicken but replacing the honey with an equal amount of Thai sweet chili sauce!


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The Secret to Crispy Turkey Skin

Perfect Turkey Skin
Who says you can’t teach an old dog new tricks?

I picked up this trick a few weeks ago from a fellow chef’s blog (I wish I could remember, but whoever you are, thank you!) and tried it for the first time with this year’s Thanksgiving turkey…it’s magic!

First of all, I ALWAYS brine my turkey, which, while making for moist, succulent meat, can cause problems with getting the skin, saturated by the brine, to crisp and brown evenly. And, let’s face it…crispy is skin is the whole reason for roasting a turkey in the first place!

Here’s the trick to perfect, crispy skin on a brined turkey…

Brine your bird for 24 hours (this is the brine I use).

Then, remove the bird from the brine, pat it dry (inside and out), and place it breast-side-up in a baking dish in the bottom of your fridge, UNCOVERED, for another 24 hours.

Remove from the fridge 2 hours before roasting, and let it rest on the counter.

Then, of course, roast it uncovered.

The skin on this turkey was amazing, by far the best results I’ve ever gotten.

If you’re a skin-junkie (that didn’t sound right…) like me, you gotta try this!

Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours!

~Chef Perry
chefperryperkins.com

Looking for more great holiday recipes? Check out the new guidebook:

“Holiday Cooking: A Home Chef’s Guide.” NOW AVAILABLE ON AMAZON!

Holiday Cooking: A Home Chef's Guide

Chef Perry’s Shrimp-a-Cado Salad

shrimpacado

This is my take on the famous Crab-a-Cado Salad recipe from Houlihan’s Old Place in Atlanta, Georgia (my birthplace, sorta.)

I found the original recipe in my father’s copy of A Chef’s Companion, and substituted the prawns for crab (it was cheaper, and I love prawns!) Dad used to make the original recipe when he’d ticked Mom off, and was tryin’ to make good.

So, we had it… a LOT. 😉

Chef Perry’s Shrimp-a-Cado Salad

  • ½ cup olive-oil mayonnaise
  • ½ cup sour cream (or paleo friendly)
  • 2 Tbs ketchup
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • ¼ cup minced celery
  • 1 hard-cooked egg, minced
  • 1 Tbs minced parsley
  • 1 head leaf lettuce (or 4 cups of salad mix)
  • 2 chilled rip avocados, halved, seeded, and peeled
  • 1 lb cooked prawns, peeled and de-veined
  • 16 chilled cherry tomatoes, peeled
  • 4 chilled artichoke hearts, drained and halved
  • 4 chilled hard-cooked eggs
  • 16 chilled, whole, pitted black olives, small

Steam shrimp until just pink, immerse in ice water to stop cooking, and cool. Drain.

Cooking perfect shrimp the easy way

In mixing bowl, blend together mayonnaise, sour cream, ketchup, and lemon juice. Stir in celery, minced eggs, and parsley. Chill.

Arrange leaf lettuce on four salad plates. Place one avocado half on each plate. Reserve a few prawns for garnish; divide remaining between the four avocado halves. Spoon a fourth of the dressing over each avocado. Place one piece of reserved shrimp on top. Sprinkle each salad lightly with paprika.

Place tomatoes on each end of the avocado. Cut each artichoke heart in half lengthwise, starting at the stem end, and place on each side of the filled avocado. Cut each hard-cooked egg in quarter wedges and place on each corner of the salad platter.

Place one whole black olive alongside each quarter of egg.

Serves 4


Looking for more great holiday recipes? Check out the new guidebook,

“Holiday Cooking: A Home Chef’s Guide.” NOW AVAILABLE ON AMAZON!

Holiday Cooking: A Home Chef's Guide

 

Chef Chris’ Sweet-Potato Hash

Sweet Potato Hash

I know that this isn’t the first time I’ve griped about this, but it’s my party and I’ll whine if I want to! 😉

One of the few downsides to being a chef and/or food blogger, is that you very seldom get invited over for a home-cooked dinner. Like…ever. Friends and family see the pretty photos and “exotic” recipes you post, and think, “Man, I can’t cook for THEM!

Which is kinda silly, as most chefs LOVE to be cooked for and our standards (or at least mine) aren’t nearly as high as people seem to think. I love Chicken McNuggets and Kraft Mac & Cheese as much as the next red-blooded American fatty!

So, to compensate for this lack of socialization, at least for our family’s sake, we tend to invite other chefs over, and they reciprocate, because every chef secretly (or not so secretly) knows that he or she is the better cook anyway, so there’s no intimidation. 😉

Last week we we’re invited over by my best friend, Chef Chris Renner and his family, for dinner and it was, of course, amazing.

Sousvide Steak with Sweet Potato Hash

Chef Chris made steaks, which he cooked sous-vide for 12 hours, and then caramelized with a blow torch, and they were unbelievably good. He accompanied those with his own Sweet Potato Hash (recipe below), which I haven’t been able to stop thinking about for a week. I brought a bag of salad.

There’s no money in trying to out-cook Chef Chris, believe me…I know.

Seriously, I was one of the best dinners I’ve eaten in a long time, and that hash is going to be a permanent addition to my holiday cooking menu.

Chef graciously shared the recipe with me, so I could share it with you, and I know it’s short notice, but if you can squeeze this into your Thanksgiving menu, you really, really, should! It’s certainly on mine.

IMG_4660Chef Chris’ Sweet Potato Hash

  • 4 med sweet potatoes, diced 1-inch cube
  • 1 sweet onion diced
  • 1/2 pound of bacon lardons
  • 1 Tbsp butter(or ghee)
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • Salt & pepper to taste

Over medium heat melt butter and oil in a large cast iron skillet. Add bacon cook for a couple of minutes.

Then add sweet potatoes and onion. Cook stirring occasionally (don’t stir too often) until potatoes are cooked. (You should get some nice caramelized bits that add a lot of flavor.)

Serves 4

Sousvide Steak with Sweet Potato Hash


Looking for more great holiday recipes? Check out the new guidebook, “Holiday Cooking: A Home Chef’s Guide.” NOW AVAILABLE ON AMAZON!

Holiday Cooking: A Home Chef's Guide

 

My Best Holiday Cooking Tips in One Video

Just in time for Thanksgiving!

Here’s a quick video of my favorite holiday cooking tips, tricks, and techniques for a safe and savory holiday feast.

Including:

~How to brine your turkey
~Safe Stuffing & Dressing
~Roasting Tips
~Carving the Perfect Bird

Be sure to subscribe to my channel for more professional kitchen tips and recipes.

Happy Holidays!

~Chef Perry


Looking for more great holiday recipes? Check out the new guidebook, “Holiday Cooking: A Home Chef’s Guide.” NOW AVAILABLE ON AMAZON!

Holiday Cooking: A Home Chef's Guide

Holiday Cooking: A Home Chef’s Guide

Holiday Cooking Home Chef GuideOkay, my friends… “Holiday Cooking: A Home Chef’s Guide” will launch on Monday, November 19th!

Everything from the perfect 90 minute roast turkey, to my peach-ginger smoked ham, to a very special Christmas Eve Cioppino.

Dozens of traditional and non-traditional holiday favorites, appetizers, side dishes, and delicious desserts, along with my best tips for a stress-free holiday feast!

UPDATE: Now available on Amazon!

Thanks!

~Chef Perry
chefperryperkins.com

PS: He’s a peek inside at one of my favorite recipes…

Candied Bacon Brie

Candied Bacon Brie

  • 1 – 8 oz. brie round               ½ pound thin bacon, diced
  • ¼ cup light brown sugar     1 Tbsp. rice vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp. real maple syrup     pinch of black pepper

Preheat oven to 350F.

In a large skillet, cook the diced bacon 10-15 minutes until just barely crisp.

Drain grease and add the bacon back to the skillet.

Stir in the brown sugar, vinegar, maple syrup, and black pepper. Simmer for 2-3 minutes until bubbly.

Line a baking dish with foil, then spray lightly with cooking spray.

Add the unwrapped brie to baking dish, and top with candied bacon mixture.

Bake brie for 10-15 minutes, then let it rest 10 minutes before serving.

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