Holiday Cooking: A Home Chef’s Guide

Holiday Cooking Home Chef GuideOkay, my friends… “Holiday Cooking: A Home Chef’s Guide” will launch on Monday, November 19th!

Everything from the perfect 90 minute roast turkey, to my peach-ginger smoked ham, to a very special Christmas Eve Cioppino.

Dozens of traditional and non-traditional holiday favorites, appetizers, side dishes, and delicious desserts, along with my best tips for a stress-free holiday feast!

UPDATE: Now available on Amazon!

Thanks!

~Chef Perry
chefperryperkins.com

PS: He’s a peek inside at one of my favorite recipes…

Candied Bacon Brie

Candied Bacon Brie

  • 1 – 8 oz. brie round               ½ pound thin bacon, diced
  • ¼ cup light brown sugar     1 Tbsp. rice vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp. real maple syrup     pinch of black pepper

Preheat oven to 350F.

In a large skillet, cook the diced bacon 10-15 minutes until just barely crisp.

Drain grease and add the bacon back to the skillet.

Stir in the brown sugar, vinegar, maple syrup, and black pepper. Simmer for 2-3 minutes until bubbly.

Line a baking dish with foil, then spray lightly with cooking spray.

Add the unwrapped brie to baking dish, and top with candied bacon mixture.

Bake brie for 10-15 minutes, then let it rest 10 minutes before serving.

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The difference between soup, stew, bisque, and chowder.

The difference between soup stew and chowder

HomeChef Kerry asks:

“What’s the difference between soup, stew, bisque, and chowder?”

Soups vs. Stews
In theory, a soup is a combination of vegetables, meat or fish cooked briefly in liquid, so the ingredients are cooked just enough to be palatable, but retain their texture.

A stew is any dish that’s prepared by stewing – meaning that the food is barely covered with liquid and simmered for a long time in a covered pot. Chili Stew is an example of a dish cooked in this manner, whose name has been shorted to just “chili” over the years.

Bisques vs. Chowders
Bisques and chowders are both thickened soups; bisque is generally smooth (pureed) while chowder is chunky, both are usually made with lots of cream and butter, and often start with a roux (see below).

Typically associated with seafood (the word “chowder” derives from the French term for the type of cauldron fishermen used to make these dishes), both words can describe non-seafood dishes as well.

Making a Basic Roux

Roux (“roo“) is a cooking mixture of flour and fat (usually butter), used as a thickener for soups and sauces, with roots dating back more than 300 years in French cuisine.

Made by combining and cooking a flour and oil paste until the raw flavor of the flour cooks out and the roux has achieved the desired color, a properly cooked roux imparts silky-smooth body and a nutty flavor while thickening soups, sauces, and gravies.

Cornstarch mixed with water (slurry), arrowroot, and other ingredients can be used in place of roux, but they don’t add any flavor to the dish, and are only used for their thickening properties.

Making gravies, sauces, and roux-based stews can be intimidating at first, but building a roux is actually a remarkably simple process that leads to many wonderful dishes, including most Cajun and Southern chowders and casseroles, often combined with a Cajun version of a mirepoix known as the “holy trinity.”

The first few steps could be used for basically any thickened sauce or gravy.

  • In a large kettle, sauté onions over medium heat, in butter until tender.
  • Add flour, salt, pepper (and any other spices); stir to make a crumbled paste. By the way, if you’re not working off a recipe, a good rule of thumb is to start with equal parts fat (butter, drippings, etc.,) to flour.
  • Cook, stirring, 1-2 minutes until roux begins to turn golden and gives off a nutty aroma (this step is KEY to cooking off the “flour-y” taste, and creating a deep, rich flavor.)
  • Gradually add water, broth, meat drippings, or milk/cream (I recommend one of the latter), starting very slowly (1/4 cup at a time) stirring constantly to keep smooth.
  • Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 1 minute.

One trick Dad taught me, while working with him at one of the restaurants, was to warm whatever liquid you’re using to just steaming. This keeps the roux from cooling (stopping the cooking process) each time you add liquid to it. Some folks disagree, but it’s never failed me.

Depending on the broth/drippings, you now have an awesome gravy. Flavor check for salt, herbs, and/or spices, and it’s ready to serve.

For stews, or chowders, this is where you’d start adding all the goodies, and more liquid (usually stock) to thin.

To watch this process, see my YouTube video, “How to make a Roux, Bechamel, & Cheese Sauce” at www.homechefvideos.com


Looking for more great holiday recipes? Check out the new guidebook, “Holiday Cooking: A Home Chef’s Guide.” NOW AVAILABLE ON AMAZON!

Holiday Cooking: A Home Chef's Guide

 

 

From the Holiday Guide: Roasted Maple Bacon Carrots

Roasted Maple Bacon Carrots

Maple Bacon Roasted Carrots
Original recipe from “Bacon: A Home Chef’s Guide”

Here’s a quick and easy recipe from the upcoming, “Holiday Cooking: A Home Chef’s Guide.”

Crispy, smoky, salty bacon-wrapped roasted carrots glazed in sweet maple syrup. The perfect side dish for any holiday meal!

The Recipe

  • 2 pounds carrots, trimmed & peeled
  • 1 lb. apple-wood smoked bacon
  • ¼ cup pure maple syrup

Wrap the carrots in the bacon.

Arrange on a wire rack on a foil wrapped baking sheet and roast in a preheated 400F. oven.

Cook until the bacon is crispy and the carrots are tender, about 20-30 minutes, glazing with the maple syrup half way through.

Home Chef Note: If you’re feeding a crowd, you can save yourself some time and make this recipe casserole-style. Chop and fry your bacon, oil a baking dish with the bacon fat, toss bacon with peeled baby carrots and maple syrup, and add to baking dish. Roast at 350F for 20 minutes!


Looking for more great holiday recipes? Check out the new guidebook, “Holiday Cooking: A Home Chef’s Guide.” NOW AVAILABLE ON AMAZON!

Holiday Cooking: A Home Chef's Guide

 

 

 

A healthy, home-cooked dinner…in 5 minutes?

potatoHow nice would it be to come home from work and have a healthy, home cooked dinner on the table…in about 5 minutes?

1. Cook up a big batch of seasoned ground beef, pork, or turkey over the weekend, portion into family-serving sizes, and freeze.

2. Before you leave for work, pop some nice big russet potatoes in the slow-cooker (see video, below), take a package of the ground meat out of the freezer, and set it in the bottom of the fridge to thaw.

(Or, make this dinner on Monday or Tuesday night, and you don’t even have to freeze the meat!)

3. When you get home, just pop the meat in the microwave (maybe with a package of your favorite frozen veggies, sloppy-joe sauce, or chili).

4. Lay out the cooked potatoes, meat, veggies, maybe some shredded cheese, sour cream, chopped onions, etc., and KABOOM…5 minute potato bar, baby!

~Chef Perry
chefperryperkins.com


The Home Chef: Transforming the American KitchenWe are entering the age of the “Home Chef”, a title that’s available to nearly everyone, regardless of age, or financial standing.

That’s what this book is about…because something amazing has begun to happen in the last two decades, something that has never before happened in the history of cooking…instead of growing wider, the gap between the home cook and the professional chef has actually begun to narrow, and continues to narrow exponentially with each passing year.

The time when these specialized skills were limited to those who could afford the cost and time required for culinary school are quickly passing into history.

The time when the sole requirement to elevate your cooking skills to this level…passion…is emerging.

It’s an amazing time to become a Home Chef…and if you have that passion, I’ll show you how.

Welcome!

Chef Perry P. Perkins

amazon

Ultimate Mother’s Day Meals Guide

BookCoverPreview.do
Click cover for your free cookbook!

Mother’s Day is almost here, and, as a Home Chef, food is OF COURSE going to be a major part of celebrating Mom!

Now, before dragging Mom off to a two-hour brunch at a fancy restaurant, ask her what SHE wants…a quiet breakfast in bed? A nice dinner with the whole family? It’s her day, right? Find out how SHE wants to celebrate it.

Also, where does she want her meal? At the dinner table, a breakfast nook, al fresco, in a bubble bath? She put’s up with us 24/7/365…she can eat where ever she wants!

Just in case you end up in the kitchen, I’ve come up with some recipes to keep in your Mother’s Day arsenal and deploy based on how much time Mom actually wants to spend celebrating herself.

Best Mother's Day Recipes

For breakfast, I propose a make-ahead menu, something you can prep (and clean up after) the night before. This might be the only morning Mom gets to sleep in all year…don’t wake her up early to the clanging of pots and pans.

If Mom is up for a nice long brunch, consider several small, light dishes with lots of fresh fruits and greens. You don’t want her too filled up before she hits the spa, right?

Chef Perrys Pasta alla Carbonara

Dinner…I say go all out! This is the time to let your inner Iron Chef shine! Just make sure that you know what Mom likes and wants to eat. Again, and nice slow-cooker, or low maintenance (read: less dirty dishes for you) is ideal, so you can enjoy a great meal, and have time afterward to play a game, or watch Mom’s favorite movie together.

Apple Crisp

And…of course…dessert. I mean, we’re talking about Mom, right? Mother’s Day dessert is about quality over quantity, and less is more with the rich, decadent dessert recipes we’re looking at.

Breakfasts

  • Blackberry Banana Smoothies
    Sweet Potato Gratin Stacks
  • Bacon Apple Cheddar Dutch Baby 
  • Patatas y Huevos Tacos 
  • Truffles Flower Eggs 
  • Mother’s Day Chili Egg Puffs

Appetizers

  • Caprese Tomato Bites 
  • Garlic-Parmesan Baked Chicken Wings
  • Sweet & Savory Bacon Wrapped Dates on the Grill
  • Pho Deviled Eggs
  • Bacon & Shrimp Mini Soft Tacos

Dinners

  • Slow Cooker Pork and Sweet Potato Curry
  • Pan-Seared Filet Mignon with Garlic-Mushroom Cream sauce
  • Redneck Ratatouille
  • Risotto ai Funghi Porcini
  • Pasta alla Carbonara
  • Poisson Meunière

Desserts

  • Easy Caramel Apple Crisp Recipe
  • Mint Oreo Truffles
  • Chocolate Peanut Butter Pot de Creme
  • Sweet Butter Rum Plantains
  • Banana Bread Muffins with Brown Sugar Glaze

So let’s jump in…let’s show Mom just how awesome she is!

Click the cover (above) to download your free guidebook and recipes.

Happy Mother’s Day!

~ Chef Perry


The Home Chef: Transforming the American Kitchen

We are entering the age of the “Home Chef”, a title that’s available to nearly everyone, regardless of age, or financial standing.

That’s what this book is about…because something amazing has begun to happen in the last two decades, something that has never before happened in the history of cooking…instead of growing wider, the gap between the home cook and the professional chef has actually begun to narrow, and continues to narrow exponentially with each passing year.

The time when these specialized skills were limited to those who could afford the cost and time required for culinary school are quickly passing into history.

The time when the sole requirement to elevate your cooking skills to this level…passion…is emerging.

It’s an amazing time to become a Home Chef…and if you have that passion, I’ll show you how.

Welcome!

Chef Perry P. Perkins

amazon

Pre-Order the Home Chef BBQ & Grilling Guidebooks, and save!

Both Books

Okay, it’s time to start taking your pre-orders for the upcoming Home Chef Guidebooks, “Barbeque” & “Grilling.

Get a head-start on BBQ season, and get both books, with FREE shipping (pre-orders only) for just $30!

Both books will ship together on Tuesday, April 3rd* (5 days before “GRILLING” even releases on Amazon!)

I will be handling all pre-orders PERSONALLY this time, and all pre-orders will ship on the 3rd! 😉

Order You Copies HERE!

Copy of FullSizeRenderBARBEQUE: A Home Chef’s Guide

Barbeque is not just a method of cooking food– it’s an experience. It’s a culture, a link to our past, a tribute to the resourcefulness of our forbearers, and a reminder of times both great and terrible.

It’s about the age-old mainstays of good food, good friends, and good times. It’s rugged but romantic.

It’s charcoal and chatter.

Here are my most popular dishes, tips, and techniques from nearly four-decades of cooking in, over, and with fire and smoke.

If you’re looking for great recipes and insights for taking your culinary skills to the next level, you’ve come to the right place. From bacon weaves, to melt-in-you-mouth brisket, to whole roast pigs…if you can cook it, low and slow, in sweet, sweet smoke…

I’ll show you how.

Welcome to the fire, Home Chefs!

7GRILLING: A Home Chef’s Guide

Grilling. It’s the most primitive of all the cooking methods. Picture our ancient ancestors spearing chunks of raw meat on sticks and gathering around a communal fire to cook their meal.

What would summer be without the sights, and sounds, and smells of meat searing to perfection over glowing coals? The laughter of friends and family, and the sharing of a delicious, flame-kissed meal?

“Grilling: A Home Chef’s Guide” includes dozens of Chef-tested, fully-illustrated recipes, tricks, techniques, and resources for grilling just about anything you can cook over fire!

I guarantee that you will see an instant, and significant improvement in your outdoor cooking! No more wiener flambé, carbonized chicken, or particle-board steaks.

Clear your calendar, strap on your apron, you’re about to become the grilling-god of your family!

~Chef Perry

Order You Copies HERE!


About the “Home Chef” Series

FullSizeRender - CopyThere are plenty of cookbooks out there, but a Home Chef’s Guide wants more than just the instructions on how to make single dish a single way.

It means continuing you kitchen education, learning the professional-level tips, tricks, and techniques the pro’s use to become a better cook…to understand cooking, healthy real-food cooking, it means advancing your culinary skills until recipes are no longer really necessary.

It means becoming a Home Chef.

Additional Home Chef titles are available on Amazon at: http://www.perryperkinsbooks.com, including:

  • The Home Chef: Transforming the American Kitchen
  • Frugal Fine Cooking: A Home Chef’s Guide
  • BACON! A Home Chef’s Guide
Prelaunch
See all of the Home Chef Titles on Amazon at: www.perryperkinsbooks.com

 

Sanbeiji (Taipei 3-Cup Chicken)

Taipei

Here’s one of my favorites from my upcoming book, “Grilling: A Home Chef’s Guide”.

Sanbeiji (Taipei 3-Cup Chicken)

Sanbeiji (literally “3-Cup Chicken”) derives it’s name from the 3 sauce ingredients: Soy Sauce, Sesame oil, and Sugar. Originating from the Jiangxi province of China, this is a hugely popular dish in Taiwan.

  •     1 cup Sesame oil                                      1 cup soy sauce
  •     1 cup white sugar                                    4 cloves fresh garlic
  •     8 bone-in chicken thighs                         2 inches fresh ginger

*For shorter cooking time, you can substitute boneless-skinless thighs, but only marinate fro 4 hours, max.

In a mortar and pestle (or food processor) reduce the garlic and ginger to a past.

Mix all ingredients together, adding chicken last. Marinate overnight (or at least six hours) turning one of twice. Pat dry, and brush both sides lightly with oil.

Split Zone Indirect Grilling
Split Zone Indirect Grilling

Spread prepared coals for Split Zone Indirect Grilling

Indirect-Cooking-5050-Split-Method

Set the chicken in the cool zone, cover (or close the lid), and cook for 20-30 minutes to an internal temperature of 160F.

One the thighs are at temp,  move them to the hot zone, and grill until well marked on both sides (3-5 minutes per side.)

TaiPei Chicken Thighs

Allow to rest 10 minutes, the slice and serve with Perfect Thai Rice, and a steamed veggie!

The Home Chef
Click on the image to learn more about my HOME CHEF series!

Let me know if you would like to recieve a one-time notification, when “Grilling: A Home Chef’s Guide” is available on Amazon.com!