Organizing Your Kitchen Like a Pro (AM Northwest appearance)

Free Printable Shopping List Reminder

If, like, me, you have the memory span of a brain-damaged goldfish, keeping one of these list reminders on the fridge is a HUGE help in having the ingredients you need, when you need them.

Just right-click on the image and save this PDF to your desktop, for a handy list reminder that you can print as needed!

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Oh, and if you tuned in to AM Northwest this morning for my segment on Kitchen Organization (I’ll post the link to the clip here, this afternoon), thank you!

UPDATE: Here’s the link to the video…(click on image)

Image may contain: 2 people, people smiling, people standing and indoor

And here’s some notes on what we talked about (and a couple we ran out of time for…)

The “two step” kitchen plan

  • The tools and utensils you use most for cooking should be within two steps of the cooking area
  • The tools and utensils you use most for prep should be within two steps of the cooking area

Your Knives

  • Have them sharpened (honing is NOT sharpening)
  • Magnetic holder vs. knife block.

Your Spices

  • No spices, oils, or vinegars over the stove
  • Write your purchase dates on bottles
  • Buy in bulk, and refill bottles (squeeze bottles for oils)

Cupboards

  • Middle (eye level to counter): Items you use most
  • Upper (eye level and above): Items you use frequently, and/or hard shelf life (cookies, crackers, cereal)
  • Lower (Counter and below): Items you use the least, bulk storage, etc.

The Fridge

  • Meat on the bottom shelf
  • Leftovers on the Middle shelf
  • Names and dates on kitchen tape
  • Packaged, unopened on the top

The Freezer

  • Names and dates on kitchen tape
  • Vacuum sealers
  • Have a defrosting schedule

Make a List

  • Checkbox shopping list & pen, on fridge
  • Download mine (above)
  • Make your own
  • Pre-print the items you get every time you go to the store
  • Organize list for a single path through the store
  • Never shop hungry, or without your list

Or, check our my FREE 52 Weeks of dinner plans, and weekly shopping lists.

Available in Classic, Heart Healthy (Diabetic Friendly), and Gluten Free!

~Chef Perry
chefperryperkins.com

Home Chef Cookbooks

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Chef Perry’s Best Recipes of 2017

Best Recipes of 2017

 

As 2017 slips into the history books, it’s time for the annual “Best Of” post!

Here are the 10 recipes and technique posts that YOU, dear readers, visited and revisited the most.

From re-heating your favorite burger, to Julia’s most famous dish, to the best fried chicken…ever.

They’re all here!

(Click on each title, for the full recipe…)

Enjoy,

~Chef Perry

  1. If you haven’t subscribed to my updates, let’s start the new year off right, and sign up now! 😉

Miracle Microwave Chicken Recipe

12 Minute Miracle Chicken

I love doing this recipe in my cooking classes, just for the look on my students faces when I tell them we’re going to make “microwave chicken.” But really, we’re making poached chicken, we’re just using the microwave as the heat source. This is a great technique to shave some time off dinner prep, by multitasking while the chicken cooks.

Boeuf Bourguignon Recipe

Boeuf Bourguignon for Julia’s Birthday

This was the very first “dish that Julia made on “The French Chef” and that was deliberate. Her goal in choosing this dish (as mine is in The Home Chef) was to demystify what was, and still is, considered one of the most delicious meals you can make, and thereby demystify cooking in general.

Pasta Carbonara on AM Northwest

Pasta alla Carbonara on AM Northwest

As the saying goes, “a great time was had by all.”

Well, I can’t speak for all, but I can tell you, this guy had a blast cooking Pasta alla Carbonara on AM Northwest!

Green Chile Egg Puff Recipe

Mother’s Day Green Chili Egg Puff

Easily, the best egg dish I’ve ever had, and it’ll be the traditional Christmas breakfast at our house from now on!

Light, fluffy, savory, ethereal…like eating an egg-flavored angel!

Dragon Claws Appetizer Recipe

“Dragon Claws” BBQ Appetizer

This one was no surprise, as it’s been in the top ten list every year since it posted after my Kenmore Grills demo at RibFest!

Sticky sweet, spicy goodness…with just a breath of fire! And…trust me on this, MUCH easier to make when there isn’t a live audience and 3 television cameras in your face!

Redneck Ratatouille Recipe

Converting Crock-Pot Recipes for the Oven

Great news…you can, absolutely, cook your crock-pot recipes in the oven, using a dutch oven, cassoulet pan, or even a cast-iron skillet and some foil.

As you know, we often include crock-pot and slow-roast recipes in our weekly meal plans, so we have a LOT of practice doing conversions!

How to reheat an IN-N-OUT (or any) Burger

In the sincere hope that nothing as glorious as a Double-Double Animal Style is ever eaten chilled, or even worse, microwaved, I give you…how to reheat an In-N-Out (or any) burger to (almost) as good as new!

he Best Southern Fried Chicken Recipe

Dad Perkins’ Southern Fried Chicken

This is a taste of my childhood, as it was a taste of my father’s childhood.

It’s so good, and I love it so much, that I pulled my poor old dad out of a well-earned retirement to cook up a huge batch for our wedding rehearsal dinner.

It was, of course, a smashing success (she still said “yes” the next day…)

Easiest Chicken Stock Recipe

Easiest Chicken Stock Recipe Ever

I’m going to say, right up front, that there’s no replacement for a deep, rich stock that’s simmered for hours, pulling every bit from flavor out of the meat and veggies, and into the liquid.

However, there are easier ways to do it, and this is my favorite…using the crock pot!

The Home Chef: Transforming the American Kitchen

The Home Chef BookPart syllabus, part autobiography, part call-to-arms, The Home Chef is about the rapidly evolving landscape of cooking in America, and how to cook real food, the best food possible, in your own kitchen, and more importantly…why you should.

Filled with insider tips and tricks from the professional kitchen, hundreds of links and resources to (free) professional level education, and easy to follow instructions from a professional cooking instructor, The Home Chef: Transforming the American Kitchen is culinary school for the home cook.

Everything you need, and nothing you don’t, to take your own culinary creations to the next level, while saving time, money, and waste doing so.

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My Best Recipe (according to my wife…)

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Smothered Burritos (or “Wet” Burritos, depending on where they’re served), were born at a the Beltline Bar in Grand Rapids, MI, where it’s called the Beltline Bar Wet Burrito. Love burritos and enchiladas? With these delicious monsters, you get the best of both worlds.

The original calls for seasoned ground beef and beans wrapped in a flour tortilla, covered in red chili sauce and cheese. What makes this NOT an enchilada, is that it uses a flour tortilla, where an enchilada is made with a corn tortilla.

I like to swap out the ground beef with Carne Adovada (Mexican pork in red sauce.) I think shredded beef brisket would be amazing, as well!

I don’t make this dish very often, as it’s a lot of work, and not even remotely healthy. Still, once or twice a year isn’t going to do too much damage!

Chef P’s Smothered Burritos

1 batch Carne Adovada*
1 batch Spanish rice*
1 batch Easy Guacamole*
1 batch Pico de Gallo*
8 extra-large flour tortillas, warmed
4 cups shredded Mexi Cheese
1 Cup sour cream (plus extra)
4 Tbs Cilantro (finely diced.)

*Recipes follow

To Assemble:

Pre-heat oven to 350F

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Place tortilla on a pre-warmed plate and spread 2 Tbs sour cream down the center, leaving two inches of tortilla at each end. Spoon 1/4 cup of Spanish Rice over the sour cream, then, using a slotted spoon, add 2/3 cup of the Carne Adovada over the rice.

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Fold up ends of tortilla and roll into a burrito, keeping the ends tucked.

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Coat the bottom of a baking dish with Carne Adovada sauce, and lay the finished burritos on top.

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Top with 1/2 of the remaining shredded cheddar cheese.

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Cover with remaining Carne Adovada sauce…

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Then the remaining cheese.

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Bake 1 hour (place the baking dish on a cookie-sheet ~ you’ll thank me!) then allow to cool 20-30 minutes on stove-top.

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To Plate:

Coat each plate with refried beans, then top each with a burrito. Top each burrito with additional sauce, and dollop with sour cream,

Serve with warm chips, guacamole, remaining pico de gallo. Sprinkle all with cilantro.

Additional Recipes:

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Carne Adovada
1 C Pico de Gallo, below
2 lbs boneless pork picnic ribs
Freshly ground black pepper
Salt
1 C olive oil
2 yellow onions
3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 Tbsp of chopped fresh oregano
2 ½ cups chicken stock
2 small can tomato paste
½ tsp chili powder
½ tsp red pepper powder

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Trim pork of excess fat and cut into 1 1/2-inch cubes

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Season the pork cubes generously with salt, pepper, oregano, and garlic.

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Mix in diced onions. Heat olive oil in a large, heavy-bottomed skillet over medium high heat and brown pork chunks well on all sides. 

Work in batches so that the pork is not crowded in the pan and has a better chance to brown well. Drain oil and dispose.

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Add the pico, tomato paste, chili powder, red pepper powder, and broth, stirring until blended.

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Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer 2 hours.

Remove solids with a slotted spoon, and raise the heat to a high simmer, reducing the sauce by half. Remove from heat, add the solids back in, and stir. Cover and set aside.

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Spanish Rice

2 tablespoons bacon drippings
1 onion, chopped fine
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 cups long-grain white rice
3 cups* chicken stock
2 Tbs tomato paste
Pinch of oregano
2 teaspoons each: salt, chili powder, and cumin

*Check the instructions on the rice package for the proportions of liquid to rice. They can range from 1:1 to 2:1. If your rice calls for 2 cups of water for every cup of rice, then for this recipe, I use 3 cups of stock for 2 cups of rice.

Combine all ingredients in your rice cooker, and cook per cooker instructions.

If you don’t have a rice cooker:

In a large skillet brown rice in olive oil, medium/high heat. Add onion and garlic.

Cook onion rice mixture, stirring frequently, about 4 minutes, or until onions are softened.

In a separate sauce pan bring stock to a simmer. Add tomato sauce, oregano, and salt. Add rice to broth. Bring to a simmer, covered.

Lower heat and cook 15-25 minutes, depending on the type of rice and the instructions on the rice package. Turn off heat and let sit for 5 minutes, then fluff rice with a fork, and set aside, uncovered.

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Simple Guacamole

3 medium Haas avocados, ripe. Peeled and diced.
1 Tbs lime juice
Salt, pepper, garlic powder to taste.

Fresh Pepper Pico

Fresh Pepper Pico de Gallo

5 fresh Roma tomatoes, chilled and diced
1/2 large white onion, diced
1/2 cup fresh cilantro, chopped
1 large orange bell pepper, diced
2 Tbs fresh squeezed lime juice
2 Tbs fresh minced garlic
Salt & pepper to taste

Combine all ingredients and refrigerate at least 1 hour before serving.

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Restaurant Style Refried Beans

1 1/2 cups dried pinto beans, rinsed and picked over
3 1/2 cups chicken stock
(or, 2 cups canned refried beans + 1 cup stock)
1/2 medium white onion, finely diced
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 1/2 teaspoons each ground cumin, chili powder
salt and pepper to taste

Add all of the ingredients, except for the salt and pepper to the crock-pot. Cook on high for 9 hours (4 hours, low, for canned). At this point the beans will be tender and a bunch of them will have popped open.

Use an immersion blender to puree the beans until smooth. Add more water as needed, or if you’re feeling decadent add a couple tablespoons of butter! (Skip this step if using canned refried beans)

Season with salt and pepper to taste.

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Bacon Primavera

Bacon Primavera recipe

A world famous pasta dish from…Nova Scotia?

Created in In 1975, by New York chef Sirio Maccioni, at the Nova Scotia summer home of Italian Baron Carlo Amato, Pasta Primavera became a classic dish of the 1970’s with its combination of butter, cream and cheese, with vegetables and pasta.

Bacon was, of course, simply the next logical step.

The Veggies
3 carrots, peeled and cut into thin strips
2 medium zucchini or 1 large zucchini, cut into thin strips
2 yellow squash, cut into thin strips
1 tablespoon dried Italian herbs or herbes de Provence
1/4 Cup Olive oil
salt & pepper, to taste

The Sauce
2 pounds plum tomatoes
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
8 strips thick-cut pepper bacon, chopped
1 med onion, halved and thinly sliced
1/2 cup dry white wine
Pinch of red pepper flakes
12 ounces trottole pasta (my new favorite!)
1/8 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley, chopped
1/8 cup fresh basil, chopped
Grated Pecorino, for serving

Blanch and peel your tomatoes (see video), reserving the water.

Bring a large pot of water (salted) to a boil. Hull the tomatoes and cut a shallow “x” through the skin on the bottom of each. Prepare an ice bath.

Cut the tomatoes in half lengthwise and squeeze out and discard the seeds, then chop the tomatoes into approximately 1/2-inch pieces.

Bacon Primavera

Put the bacon in a large cold skillet and cook, stirring occasionally, over medium heat until crisp. Transfer the bacon to paper towels, and discard all but 2 tablespoons of the bacon fat from the skillet.

Add the onion to the skillet and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until soft and just beginning to brown, about 10 minutes. Add the wine, simmering until reduced by half. Add the tomatoes, red pepper flakes, 1/2 teaspoon salt and pepper to taste. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the tomatoes begin to break down, 5-6 minutes. SeVeggiest aside (keep warm)

On a large heavy baking sheet, toss the carrots, zukes, and yellow squash with the oil, salt, pepper, and dried herbs to coat.

Transfer half of the vegetable mixture to another heavy large baking sheet and arrange evenly over the baking sheets.

Bake until the carrots are tender and the vegetables begin to brown, stirring after the first 10 minutes, about 20 minutes total.

trottole3Meanwhile, cook the trottole according to “Perfect Pasta” directions in the reserved pot of tomato water until al dente, about 10 minutes.

Save 1 cup of the cooking water, and drain the pasta. Add pasta to the sauce, in the skillet, with 1/2 cup of the reserved cooking water. Toss to coat. Add more water if necessary for desired consistency.

Stir in half the bacon and half the herbs, toss in th veggies, and season to taste with salt and pepper.

Divide the pasta, sauce, and veggies among plates, and top with the remaining bacon and herbs.

Sprinkle with Pecorino, and serve.


The Home Chef's Guide to Bacon!The Home Chef: Transforming the American Kitchen” was your overview of the basic concepts and tips for taking your cooking to the next level, but let’s face it, you can only fit so much information into one book!

Each Home Chef Guidebook delves more deeply into the professional quality recipes and techniques of specific cooking styles and cuisines.

This one is all about BACON.

amazon

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Chef Perry’s Bacon & Four-Cheese Scalloped Potatoes

Bacon Four Cheese Scalloped Potatoes

Here’s a sneak-peek from the upcoming Home Chef Guidebook: “Bacon!” Let’s face it, as comfort foods go, scalloped potatoes are pretty hard to beat, and this version is completely over the top!

Creamy, cheesy goodness with a umami blast of bacon…these potatoes are my happy place!

~ Chef Perry

Bacon & Four-Cheese Scalloped Potatoes

  • 2 pounds yellow potatoes, unpeeled and sliced 1/4 inch thick
  • 1 small sweet onion, minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into pieces, plus more for brushing
  • 1/4 cup sweet cream butter (for cheese sauce)
  • 1/4 cup AP Flour
  • 1/2 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
  • 1/2 cup shredded asiago cheese
  • 1/2 cup shredded raclette or comte cheese
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 8 oz Thick bacon lardons, fried crisp and drained
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Position a rack in the upper third of the oven and preheat to 425 degrees F. Generously brush a large baking dish with butter. Combine the mozzarella, asiago and raclette in a bowl (but NOT the Parmesan).

Cut bacon into lardons.

Bacon Lardons

Fry until crisp, drain on paper towels, and set aside.

Fried Bacon Lardons

For the Roux: In 2-quart saucepan, melt the 1/4 cup of the butter over medium heat. Cook onion and garlic in butter about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally, until tender. Stir in flour, salt and pepper (this is a roux). Cook the roux, stirring constantly, until smooth and golden brown; remove from heat. Stir in milk a little at a time, repeat with heavy cream. Heat to boiling, stirring constantly. Boil and stir 1 minute.

You now have a Béchamel, one of the 5 French “Mother Sauces” and the backbone of cheese sauces.

Remove the white sauce from the heat and stir in the cheese blend, 1/2 a cup at a time, until smooth. Keep warm.

Sliced Yellow Potatoes

Slice the potatoes skin on (optional). I like mine a little thicker, but you can slice them thinner than this, according to your preference. Blanch the potato slices in simmering, salted, water until just starting to soften. Shock in cold water to stop cooking.

Sliced potatoes in dish

To the baking dish, add half of the potatoes, spreading them out. Sprinkle with 3/4 teaspoon salt, half of the cut-up butter, half of the bacon lardons, half of the cheese sauce, and pepper to taste. Arrange the remaining potatoes and bacon on top. Sprinkle with 3/4 teaspoon salt, and pepper to taste. Pour the remaining bacon, then cheese sauce over the potatoes, then add the nutmeg. Dot the potatoes with the remaining cut-up butter.

Sprinkle the potatoes with the Parmesan.

Bacon Four Cheese Scalloped Potatoes

Bake until golden, about 25 minutes. Let rest 10 minutes before serving.


Bacon A Home Chef's GuideThe Home Chef: Transforming the American Kitchen” was your overview of the basic concepts and tips for taking your cooking to the next level, but let’s face it, you can only fit so much information into one book!

Each Home Chef Guidebook delves more deeply into the professional quality recipes and techniques of specific cooking styles and cuisines.

This one is all about BACON. amazon


 

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“Bacon! A Home Chef’s Guide” NOW AVAILABLE!

The Home Chef's Guide to Bacon!“The Home Chef: Transforming the American Kitchen” was your overview of the professional techniques, concepts, and tips for taking your cooking to the next level, but…let’s face it, you can only fit so much information into one book!

Each Home Chef Guidebook delves more deeply into the professional quality recipes and techniques of specific cooking styles and cuisines.

This one is all about BACON.

Bacon is the candy-apple red hot-rod of the food world. We want it, but we also fear it a little, which makes us want it even more…

Each year in the U.S. more than 1.7 billion lbs. of bacon are consumed – equivalent to the weight of 8 1/2 Nimitz class aircraft carriers. 65% of Americans would support bacon as their “national food” and more than half of us claim that we would rather have bacon than sex.

Bacon is kinda a big deal!

Let’s learn about bacon, the types of bacon out there, the best techniques for cooking it, and the most delicious recipes available for God’s most perfect meat.

Click here to order your copies today for the bacon-junkies on your Christmas list, and get free shipping!

Welcome, Home Chefs!

~Chef Perry
www.chefperryperkins.com

The Home Chef: Transforming the American Kitchen 
The Home Chef’s Guide to Frugal Fine Cooking 
Bacon! A Home Chef’s Guide

 
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Help us help kids (and get a great book!)

Home Chef Book Fundraiser

Cover in FrameI’m donating 100% of sales from “The Home Chef’s Guide to Frugal Fine Cooking” AND “The Home Chef: Transforming the American Kitchen” to the MY KITCHEN OUTREACH Program, to help feed the hungry, and teach important life skills to at-risk and special-needs youth.

This guidebook would make a great gift for struggling families, college students, and young couples trying to eat healthy on a limited budget!

Proceeds will only be used to pay for teaching materials, supplies, and ingredients for classes. I’ll post the results here, at MY KITCHEN Outreach Program on Monday, October 16th.

Please place your order, on Amazon, before midnight TONIGHT, to help support the outreach!

Cover in frameThese funds will be earmarked specifically for the new youth classes we’ll be doing for the high school in Stevenson WA, and for our annual turkey roast (10 this year!) for The Father’s Heart Street Ministry. Anything left over will go into the general use fund for MK.

Order your copies of “The Home Chef’s Guide to Frugal Fine Cooking” HERE.

BOTH are availabe on my Amazon author page: www.perryperkinsbooks.com

PLEASE LET YOUR FRIENDS KNOW (by using the “sharing buttons”, below!)

Thank you for helping us help kids!

Chef Perry
chefperryperkins.com

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Thai Red Fish Curry

Frugal Red Fish Curry recipe

The Home Chef's Guide to Frugal Fine Cooking(Excerpt from “The Home Chef’s Guide to Frugal Fine Cooking” Available October 15, 2017. This is the first in a series of guidebooks to delve deeper into specific topics discussed in, “The Home Chef: Transforming the American Kitchen” – available on Amazon.)

Regarding Curry…

“Curry” can be a confusing term. It’s the name of an entire family of Indian, and Indian-influenced, dishes, but it’s also the name of spice blends within those dishes, and those blend of spices are different from region to region, and, typically, house to house.

Instead of a specific recipe, with set ingredients, think of it as a term like “sauce”, for which there can be uncountable varieties (and my mom’s is always better than your mom’s…)

Curries in Thailand (usually a mix of curry spice paste, coconut milk or water, meat, seafood, vegetables or fruit, and herbs) mainly differ from the curries in Indian cuisine in their use of fresh ingredients such as herbs and aromatic leaves, instead of a mix of dried, and then toasted and ground, spices.

The dry, powdery stuff we buy in the jars is a lot like kissing your sister…similar…but not quite the same thing.

My personal favorite Indian blend (when not toasting and grinding it fresh) is the “Bombay Curry” from my beloved Market Spice, in Seattle’s Pike Place Market.

Curries (the dishes) are a great way to add a touch of the exotic to a frugal dinner, while using up leftover meats and veggies, at the same time.

Think about it…both India and Thailand are home to some of the poorest people (and the best food) on the planet.

Once again, it’s less about what you’ve got, than what you can do with it.

Thai Red Fish Curry

1lb tilapia
1 knob of ginger, peeled
2 cloves of garlic
1 stalk lemongrass, minced
Juice of half a lime
2-3 fresh red chilies
1 Tbs tomato puree
1 onion, very finely chopped
Oil
2 Tbs fish sauce
2 cups coconut milk
1 cup water
A generous pinch of salt
Cilantro to garnish

To make the curry paste blend together the ginger, garlic, lemongrass, lime juice, chilies, tomato puree and a little oil.

Heat a little more oil in a large saucepan and begin to fry the onions. After 5 minutes add the paste and cook for a further 10 minutes.

Tip in the coconut milk and water and continue to cook to allow the flavors to infuse, and the sauce to reduce a bit.

Season the sauce to taste before adding the fish in large, skinless chunks. Cook for 5-10 minutes, until the fish is completely done.

At this point one can serve the dish, though if the sauce is a little thin one may opt to remove the fish from the sauce and turn the heat up for a little while.

Ensure it is served piping hot, sticky rice, mango slices, and fresh cilantro are optional.

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Southern Chicken & Dumplin’s

Southern Chicken & Dumplings

Having just moved from the farm to the suburbs, we’re only allowed a half-dozen chickens, which means…we have a few in the freezer now.

Circle of life, baby.

This is my favorite recipe for using a yard-bird that is a bit past her prime, and one that was handed down from my grandmother, who kept her own small flock for the family’s eggs and an occasional pot of soup.

This is classic Southern comfort food at it’s best. If you’re not wild about dumplings, you can leave them out, and ladle this soup over fresh-baked buttermilk biscuits, as well.

Grandma’s Chicken & Dumplin’s

  • 1 large broiler-fryer chicken, cut up
  • 2 celery ribs, sliced
  • 4 carrots, peeled and sliced
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 4 cups homemade chicken stock
  • 1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
  • 1 Tbsp fresh garlic, minced
  • 1/2 tsp powdered sage
  • 2 Tbs butter
  • 1 Tbs grapeseed oil
  • 2 teaspoons chicken base
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon coarse black pepper
  • hot water
  • Southern style dumplings (recipe below)

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In a heavy-bottom pot, melt the butter with oil over medium heat, and brown the chicken pieces (including back) with salt & pepper. Remove chicken and set aside.

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Add celery, carrots, onion (Mire Poix), parsley, sage, and garlic to the pot, and saute until just softened, scraping up any browned bits left from the chicken.

Southern Style Chicken and Dumplings Recipe

Add chicken back into the pot, along with chicken broth and base; add enough hot water to cover chicken.

Home Chef Note: Unless specified, you always want to add heated liquid to a hot dish, otherwise the drop in temperature and adversely effect the cooking time and texture of the recipe.

Bring to a boil; reduce heat, cover and simmer for 2 hours or until chicken is done.

Remove chicken and let stand until cool enough to handle, then remove skin from chicken and tear meat away from bones. Return meat to soup; discard skin and bones.

Taste for seasonings, and add more salt and pepper to taste, if desired.

If you like what I’m posting, please share! If you love what I’m posting, and want to help me feed the hungry, and teach at-risk and special needs kids to cook for themselves, please consider becoming a patron at my Patreon page!

Southern Style Dumplings Recipe

Drop dumplings into simmering soup. Cover and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes.

Serve immediately.

 

Serves 6

Southern Style Dumplings Recipe

Southern Style Dumplings

  • 2 1/2 cups flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 2 beaten eggs
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup buttermilk milk
  • 3/4 cup homemade chicken stock
  • 3 tablespoons oil

Combine all; mix well to form a stiff batter.

Drop by tablespoonfuls into simmering soup.

Cover and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes.

Home Chef Note: Traditionally, the dumplings start out as round, ping-pong size balls. If you prefer something a little less dense, try making them about half that size, and flattening into 1/2 inch thick coins, before adding to the soup. This will result in more dumplings, that are less of a mouthful each.

 

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From “The Home Chef”: Butter Poached Garlic

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Click here to pick up The Home Chef, on Amazon.com

This is one of those little “Chef Secrets” that can elevate a great dish into the range of freakin’ amazing.

Slowly poaching the garlic cloves in butter adds an amazingly sweet, deep roasted-garlic flavor without the often accompanying hint of bitterness…and, of course, who doesn’t like garlic butter?

I use this technique with mashed potatoes (just add warmed heavy cream), in poultry stuffing, to toss with fresh green beans, asparagus, or wilted spinach, and it’s my go-to finishing ingredient to brush on steak or pork chops, just before serving, as well as a can’t-do-without addition to my favorite noodle soups. And it couldn’t be easier.

For four servings of…well, anything…

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Butter Poached Garlic
1 cube Sweet Cream Butter
10-12 fresh whole garlic cloves, peeled
1/4 tsp. fine sea salt

In a small pan, melt butter over medium low heat.

Add garlic and salt, and poach for 20 minutes, tossing occasionally.

When a fork or knife can pierce the garlic with absolutely no resistance, it’s done. Remove from heat and allow to cool for 10 minutes. Add garlic and butter to a blender, or use an immersion blender or even a fork to mash and mix the garlic together into a smooth slurry.

OR, allow to cool slightly and store the whole garlic cloves, covered in butter.

Use immediately, or cover, store and chill for up to a week in the fridge.

Garlic is divine.

Few food items can taste so many distinct ways, handled correctly. Misuse of garlic is a crime. Old garlic, burnt garlic, garlic cut too long ago and garlic that has been tragically smashed through one of those abominations, the garlic press, are all disgusting.

Please treat your garlic with respect. Sliver it for pasta, like you saw in Goodfellas; don’t burn it. Smash it, with the flat of your knife blade if you like, but don’t put it through a press.

I don’t know what that junk is that squeezes out the end of those things, but it ain’t garlic.

And try roasting garlic. It gets mellower and sweeter if you roast it whole, still on the clove, to be squeezed out later when it’s soft and brown.

Nothing will permeate your food more irrevocably and irreparably than burnt or rancid garlic.

Avoid at all costs that vile spew you see rotting in oil in screw-top jars.

Too lazy to peel fresh?

You don’t deserve to eat garlic.

~ Anthony Bourdain

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